“Please help me persuade Transport for London to please help me persuade TfL to prevent staff members from mistreating customers.” – Andra Catincescu

Description

Andra Catincescu

On Mon the 9th of April 2012 at approx. 8:50 am, I queued for the ticket office at Hammersmith Tube Station (District & Piccadilly). I had to make King’s Cross Rail for a 10 o’clock train.

I reached one of the two ticket offices – the right-hand side one, and was greeted by a middle-aged gray haired gentleman, who looked tall and about 50 or 60 something years old. I did not make a note of the name on his badge, which I regret in hindsight.

I handed him my registered Oyster card and my recently re-newed 16-25 Railcard. He handed me an Oyster registration form and insisted I must first register my Oyster card. I calmly explained that my Oyster card was already registered. He responded that he would not help me unless I filled in a form.

I begun to fill in a form, thereby losing my place in the queue. When I reached the ‘password’ box, I realised that my task of filling in a form was completely redundant as my Oyster has been registered ever since 2009, and I already had a password.

I meant to speak to the same gentleman so queued again, but this time the left ticket office became available once I had reached the front of the queue (for the second time).

This time I was greeted by a middle-aged short looking gentleman with light coloured bushy hair and glasses. I handed him my Railcard and my Oyster card and explained there must have been some confusion, since my Oyster card had already been registered years ago and already had had two Railcards attached to it, so it was simply a case of re-attaching a re-newed Railcard. The man at the desk replied: ‘I understand the problem. Had you come to me first, I would have been able to help you in a minute. But you went to my colleague first, and my colleague told you [that] you need to fill in a form. I can’t go against what my colleague said, I can’t go over the head of my colleague.’

I politely mentioned I was in a bit of a rush to catch my train, that because of that I would be very grateful if my request was dealt with promptly, and that I would be more than glad to apologise to the “colleague” for any incovenience. However, the gentleman at the ticket office reiterated that he is not prepared to go over his colleague’s head, and insisted I ‘should have come here first’; as if there was any way I could have dreamt that a simple operation which had never taken me longer than two minutes in the past, would suddenly become a matter of collegial solidarity. Much less that a TfL employee would support a fellow employee who had simply refused to serve a customer for a contrived reason.
Understandably, I requested that I be allowed to speak to a manager. Both the gentlemen at the ticket office retorted rather brusquely that there was no point in speaking to a manager, and that nobody would help me unless I did what the ‘colleague’ told me to.

At that point another TfL employee opened a door and walked out of the ticket office area, a tall late 60s looking gentleman, partially bald, and wearing a shirt, tie and vest with the TfL logo. I walked up to him and attempted to once again politely explain, the situation, stressing that the delay was making me late for my train.

The gentleman replied that ‘Since your Oyster was already registered, you shouldn’t have to fill in another form, but you were told to fill in a form, so do whatever he [the colleague] said’. At this point I understood I was simply being made the object of a petty ambition, that I was openly treated rudely and inconsiderately and that nobody bothered to conceal that fact and assume as much as the pretense of politeness. Furthermore, and this is what I found truly shocking, the other employees, though explicitly disagreeing with their “colleague”’s appalling treatment of me, still insisted they could not go over the head of a “colleague”, and thus openly endorsed the mistreatment of a customer.

It felt like being bullied in a playground. I have never before found myself bullied by grown men, especially men in uniform with name tags and TfL logos, who clearly should represent the image of TfL and reflect the high standards of the company. However, their behaviour was sadly a far cry from decent customer service.

At this point I could not have imagined that something far worse would follow.

Feeling, by this point, humiliated, confused and distressed, I was directed to the Station Supervisor’s office by an employee who was standing by the Oyster barriers. For this purpose, I was allowed to pass through the barriers without touching in.

Already in tears, I found myself in front of the Station Supervisor, a [name redacted; sent to TfL] I explained what had happened, that I had been treated with great rudeness, that as a result I was now probably running late for my train, and that I was extremely disappointed to be subjected to such harassment and in such a manner by TfL employees, especially since I had never before had any reason to complain about the standards of the customer service, and I have been using TfL services ever since 2007.

[name redacted] assured me that he would investigate the situation and re-attach my Railcard to my Oyster. He walked out of his own office, and into the ticket offices. Five minutes later, he returned not with an apology, but with an Oyster registration form and a pen.

I explained (once again) that my Oyster was already registered and that re-registering a registered Oyster would obviously be redundant. He retorted that this was ‘Company policy’. I asked how had it then happened that two other TfL employees had explicitly told me I should not in fact need to re-register my registered Oyster card, and
[name redacted] cut me off insisting that it was ‘New company policy’. I asked if I had been misled by the other employees in that case, as I saw no reason why I should be told conflicting things by four different TfL employees (including himself). At this point
[name redacted] became very aggressive and rude. He accused me of lying about running late for my train, despite the fact that I was holding a Railcard that contained a train ticket with the train departure time on it! He accused me of rudeness, and picked up the pen and began pressuring me to give him my personal details, saying he would fill in the form for me himself, and insisted that I was wasting his time, telling lies and being rude. Needless to say, this sort of verbal abuse was very intimidating at the time.

Being subjected to this further and more aggressive harassment, I gave in to my outrage, found myself tearing up again, and indicated the form, insisting that I already had a password for my Oyster card, and asking him to explain why I should provide a new password, considering that the old one had been in use since 2009. He repeated that I was wasting his time, even more violently. I protested that he should not be allowed to treat a paying customer in this manner.
[name redacted] then lashed out: ‘You are not a paying customer. You didn’t give me your details’. According to
[name redacted] I did not qualify as a paying customer, even though I was at this point holding my registered Oyster card, topped up with credit, and that I had been using for several times a day during the past four days.

I realised the conversation was not going to lead anywhere.
[name redacted] never offered as much as an apology for the rudeness I had been subjected to, for the time that I had been forced to waste, for the train departure time that I was near to missing. Quite the opposite: he treated me with far greater rudeness than I had encountered at the ticket office, raising his voice, stepping into my personal space and repeatedly calling me a liar.

I stated that I would write a complaint, and requested that I be given the names of the ticket office TfL employees that had misled me.
[name redacted] refused to disclose the names of the employees, and once again refused to even acknowledge that I had been treated with unacceptable rudeness and lack of consideration.
[name redacted] requested that I simply use his name instead on the complaint, since he bears responsibility for all his employees.
[name redacted] then added, helpfully, that nothing would come of my complaint ‘anyway’.

He then asked me to ‘Get out’, on a distinctly unfriendly tone. I picked up my suitcase and umbrella and stepped out of his office. I was walking towards the Oyster barriers in order to touch in and get on a tube towards King’s Cross, in the hope of perhaps catching my train.

However,
[name redacted] had not finished with me. He followed me outside and asked where I thought I was going. I calmly responded, stating the above. He said ‘That’s what you think. You’re going to go downstairs [onto the platform, without having touched in], follow the signs to the exit, leave the station, and then come back and touch in. Do it. Now.’ This obviously meant not only that I would be forced to pointlessly carry my suitcase up and down two flights of stairs and over the length of an entire platform, but that on attempting to exit the station via the platform, I would be charged the maximum fee for failure to touch in, since
[name redacted] was not in the mood to permit me to touch in. Satisfied that he had now frightened and humiliated me in public to a sufficient degree, he then walked back into his office.

I did not know what to do and could not believe that a TfL employee could ever treat me in such an appalling way. I was mortified. I was hoping the Station Supervisor would resolve the issue and apologise on behalf of TfL, I had never expected such harassment from someone in a position of authority. To say
[name redacted]’s behaviour was abusive would have meant putting it mildly.

Noticing how distressed I was, the TfL employee who had been minding the Oyster barriers and had thus witnessed the last scene, walked up to me and proceeded to calm me. I was visibly shaken. He assured me that I would not be forced to leave the station. I had genuinely been terrified that
[name redacted] would call security to drag me out.

The TfL employee took my Oyster card and touched in for me, and then very kindly directed me to the appropriate platform. He asked me if I was alright, and I gave him a brief account of what had happened, and mentioned that the
[name redacted] had declined to give me the names of the gentlemen at the ticket office.

I was assured that a Supervisor would never withhold that sort of information from a customer, since that was specifically the purpose of TfL employees wearing name tags, so as they could be held accountable for rudeness or abuse.

The gentleman was about to allow me to pass through the barrier again, so as to make a note of the names of the gentlemen that had mistreated me earlier. At that point,
[name redacted] came back out of his office and shouted at the employee who had been helping me that (and I quote:) ‘This is not your job’ and ‘Go mind the barrier’. I would have been quite interested to hear what
[name redacted] assumes the job of TfL employees is, if it is not to provide assistance to travelling customers.

Having withstood as much as I could of this ordeal, I thanked the one and only TfL employee who had demonstrated any sort of customer service skills, not to mention simple politeness and any shred of friendliness and approachability, and rushed to get on to the tube.

Having been so severely delayed, I finally managed to get on my train just as it was about to depart King’s Cross.

Problem History

  • 1 Andra Catincescu reported the issue on FixMyTransport. close 11:55 11 Apr 2012
  • 2 Andra Catincescu wrote to Transport for London close 11:55 11 Apr 2012

    Here is the letter that Andra Catincescu wrote.

    Subjected to Verbal Abuse and Harassment by TfL Staff

    On Mon the 9th of April 2012 at approx. 8:50 am, I queued for the ticket office at Hammersmith Tube Station (District & Piccadilly). I had to make King’s Cross Rail for a 10 o’clock train.

    I reached one of the two ticket offices – the right-hand side one, and was greeted by a middle-aged gray haired gentleman, who looked tall and about 50 or 60 something years old. I did not make a note of the name on his badge, which I regret in hindsight.

    I handed him my registered Oyster card and my recently re-newed 16-25 Railcard. He handed me an Oyster registration form and insisted I must first register my Oyster card. I calmly explained that my Oyster card was already registered. He responded that he would not help me unless I filled in a form.

    I begun to fill in a form, thereby losing my place in the queue. When I reached the ‘password’ box, I realised that my task of filling in a form was completely redundant as my Oyster has been registered ever since 2009, and I already had a password.

    I meant to speak to the same gentleman so queued again, but this time the left ticket office became available once I had reached the front of the queue (for the second time).

    This time I was greeted by a middle-aged short looking gentleman with light coloured bushy hair and glasses. I handed him my Railcard and my Oyster card and explained there must have been some confusion, since my Oyster card had already been registered years ago and already had had two Railcards attached to it, so it was simply a case of re-attaching a re-newed Railcard. The man at the desk replied: ‘I understand the problem. Had you come to me first, I would have been able to help you in a minute. But you went to my colleague first, and my colleague told you [that] you need to fill in a form. I can’t go against what my colleague said, I can’t go over the head of my colleague.’

    I politely mentioned I was in a bit of a rush to catch my train, that because of that I would be very grateful if my request was dealt with promptly, and that I would be more than glad to apologise to the “colleague” for any incovenience. However, the gentleman at the ticket office reiterated that he is not prepared to go over his colleague’s head, and insisted I ‘should have come here first’; as if there was any way I could have dreamt that a simple operation which had never taken me longer than two minutes in the past, would suddenly become a matter of collegial solidarity. Much less that a TfL employee would support a fellow employee who had simply refused to serve a customer for a contrived reason.
    Understandably, I requested that I be allowed to speak to a manager. Both the gentlemen at the ticket office retorted rather brusquely that there was no point in speaking to a manager, and that nobody would help me unless I did what the ‘colleague’ told me to.

    At that point another TfL employee opened a door and walked out of the ticket office area, a tall late 60s looking gentleman, partially bald, and wearing a shirt, tie and vest with the TfL logo. I walked up to him and attempted to once again politely explain, the situation, stressing that the delay was making me late for my train.

    The gentleman replied that ‘Since your Oyster was already registered, you shouldn’t have to fill in another form, but you were told to fill in a form, so do whatever he [the colleague] said’. At this point I understood I was simply being made the object of a petty ambition, that I was openly treated rudely and inconsiderately and that nobody bothered to conceal that fact and assume as much as the pretense of politeness. Furthermore, and this is what I found truly shocking, the other employees, though explicitly disagreeing with their “colleague”’s appalling treatment of me, still insisted they could not go over the head of a “colleague”, and thus openly endorsed the mistreatment of a customer.

    It felt like being bullied in a playground. I have never before found myself bullied by grown men, especially men in uniform with name tags and TfL logos, who clearly should represent the image of TfL and reflect the high standards of the company. However, their behaviour was sadly a far cry from decent customer service.

    At this point I could not have imagined that something far worse would follow.

    Feeling, by this point, humiliated, confused and distressed, I was directed to the Station Supervisor’s office by an employee who was standing by the Oyster barriers. For this purpose, I was allowed to pass through the barriers without touching in.

    Already in tears, I found myself in front of the Station Supervisor, a [name redacted; sent to TfL] I explained what had happened, that I had been treated with great rudeness, that as a result I was now probably running late for my train, and that I was extremely disappointed to be subjected to such harassment and in such a manner by TfL employees, especially since I had never before had any reason to complain about the standards of the customer service, and I have been using TfL services ever since 2007.

    [name redacted] assured me that he would investigate the situation and re-attach my Railcard to my Oyster. He walked out of his own office, and into the ticket offices. Five minutes later, he returned not with an apology, but with an Oyster registration form and a pen.

    I explained (once again) that my Oyster was already registered and that re-registering a registered Oyster would obviously be redundant. He retorted that this was ‘Company policy’. I asked how had it then happened that two other TfL employees had explicitly told me I should not in fact need to re-register my registered Oyster card, and
    [name redacted] cut me off insisting that it was ‘New company policy’. I asked if I had been misled by the other employees in that case, as I saw no reason why I should be told conflicting things by four different TfL employees (including himself). At this point
    [name redacted] became very aggressive and rude. He accused me of lying about running late for my train, despite the fact that I was holding a Railcard that contained a train ticket with the train departure time on it! He accused me of rudeness, and picked up the pen and began pressuring me to give him my personal details, saying he would fill in the form for me himself, and insisted that I was wasting his time, telling lies and being rude. Needless to say, this sort of verbal abuse was very intimidating at the time.

    Being subjected to this further and more aggressive harassment, I gave in to my outrage, found myself tearing up again, and indicated the form, insisting that I already had a password for my Oyster card, and asking him to explain why I should provide a new password, considering that the old one had been in use since 2009. He repeated that I was wasting his time, even more violently. I protested that he should not be allowed to treat a paying customer in this manner.
    [name redacted] then lashed out: ‘You are not a paying customer. You didn’t give me your details’. According to
    [name redacted] I did not qualify as a paying customer, even though I was at this point holding my registered Oyster card, topped up with credit, and that I had been using for several times a day during the past four days.

    I realised the conversation was not going to lead anywhere.
    [name redacted] never offered as much as an apology for the rudeness I had been subjected to, for the time that I had been forced to waste, for the train departure time that I was near to missing. Quite the opposite: he treated me with far greater rudeness than I had encountered at the ticket office, raising his voice, stepping into my personal space and repeatedly calling me a liar.

    I stated that I would write a complaint, and requested that I be given the names of the ticket office TfL employees that had misled me.
    [name redacted] refused to disclose the names of the employees, and once again refused to even acknowledge that I had been treated with unacceptable rudeness and lack of consideration.
    [name redacted] requested that I simply use his name instead on the complaint, since he bears responsibility for all his employees.
    [name redacted] then added, helpfully, that nothing would come of my complaint ‘anyway’.

    He then asked me to ‘Get out’, on a distinctly unfriendly tone. I picked up my suitcase and umbrella and stepped out of his office. I was walking towards the Oyster barriers in order to touch in and get on a tube towards King’s Cross, in the hope of perhaps catching my train.

    However,
    [name redacted] had not finished with me. He followed me outside and asked where I thought I was going. I calmly responded, stating the above. He said ‘That’s what you think. You’re going to go downstairs [onto the platform, without having touched in], follow the signs to the exit, leave the station, and then come back and touch in. Do it. Now.’ This obviously meant not only that I would be forced to pointlessly carry my suitcase up and down two flights of stairs and over the length of an entire platform, but that on attempting to exit the station via the platform, I would be charged the maximum fee for failure to touch in, since
    [name redacted] was not in the mood to permit me to touch in. Satisfied that he had now frightened and humiliated me in public to a sufficient degree, he then walked back into his office.

    I did not know what to do and could not believe that a TfL employee could ever treat me in such an appalling way. I was mortified. I was hoping the Station Supervisor would resolve the issue and apologise on behalf of TfL, I had never expected such harassment from someone in a position of authority. To say
    [name redacted]’s behaviour was abusive would have meant putting it mildly.

    Noticing how distressed I was, the TfL employee who had been minding the Oyster barriers and had thus witnessed the last scene, walked up to me and proceeded to calm me. I was visibly shaken. He assured me that I would not be forced to leave the station. I had genuinely been terrified that
    [name redacted] would call security to drag me out.

    The TfL employee took my Oyster card and touched in for me, and then very kindly directed me to the appropriate platform. He asked me if I was alright, and I gave him a brief account of what had happened, and mentioned that the
    [name redacted] had declined to give me the names of the gentlemen at the ticket office.

    I was assured that a Supervisor would never withhold that sort of information from a customer, since that was specifically the purpose of TfL employees wearing name tags, so as they could be held accountable for rudeness or abuse.

    The gentleman was about to allow me to pass through the barrier again, so as to make a note of the names of the gentlemen that had mistreated me earlier. At that point,
    [name redacted] came back out of his office and shouted at the employee who had been helping me that (and I quote:) ‘This is not your job’ and ‘Go mind the barrier’. I would have been quite interested to hear what
    [name redacted] assumes the job of TfL employees is, if it is not to provide assistance to travelling customers.

    Having withstood as much as I could of this ordeal, I thanked the one and only TfL employee who had demonstrated any sort of customer service skills, not to mention simple politeness and any shred of friendliness and approachability, and rushed to get on to the tube.

    Having been so severely delayed, I finally managed to get on my train just as it was about to depart King’s Cross.

  • 3 [email address] responded to Andra Catincescu close 12:00 11 Apr 2012
    Thank you for your email. We can now confirm that this has been
    received.

    For further information about the Surface Transport Complaints
    and Feedback Policy including timescales, please see
    [1]http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/about-tf...

    Problems with roadworks or other street faults? In support of
    the Mayor’s Streetworks Code of Conduct to help cut congestion,
    please report these issues by visiting
    [2]http://www.tfl.gov.uk/roadusers/reportas...

    show quoted sections

    References

    Visible links
    1. http://www.tfl.gov.uk/corporate/about-tf...
    2. http://www.tfl.gov.uk/roadusers/reportas...
  • 4 Martin Heron commented close 12:19 11 Apr 2012

    If everything you have said is true and completely accurate then this is clearly not acceptable. We will see what TfL say.

  • 5 Dave Williams commented close 20:11 11 Apr 2012

    Tweeted and Facebooked. This is disgusting and unacceptable. All I can say is that this incident will have been recorded on CCTV, and hopefully any higher-up investigation can use that to prove your case.

  • 6 Owen Blacker commented close 20:50 11 Apr 2012

    Obscene treatment by the TfL staff there. As Dave Williams mentioned, this will al have been recorded on CCTV. Can I suggest you make a Subject Access Request under the Data Protection Act for that CCTV footage. If you provide enough information to identify you (so date, time and what you were wearing, as well as whereabouts you were), they're legally obliged to provide you with a copy of your data.

    TfL provide information about DPA Subject Access Requests at http://www.tfl.gov.uk/termsandconditions/11465.aspx and the Information Commissioner's Office (who oversee the Data Protection Acts, amongst other things) provide more information at http://www.ico.gov.uk/for_the_public/personal_information/how_manage/access_info.aspx

    Good luck; I hope you get some recompense for the disgusting treatment you suffered.

  • 7 Owen Blacker commented close 20:52 11 Apr 2012

    The Information Commissioner's link again (for anyone who's finding it chopped off by the fixed width) is http://bit.ly/Itsjw9

  • 8 Myf Nixon commented close 21:31 11 Apr 2012

    FixMyTransport admin here. Andra, I am very shocked by this account and sincerely hope that you are able to receive some kind of satisfactory conclusion.

    I have taken the precaution of removing the name of the member of staff involved. It has been sent, along with your original message, to TfL, just removed from this public webpage.

    Our policy is to remove full names of staff where they are reported to have been engaging in illegal or abusive behaviour. We do this promptly when we come across them or our attention is drawn to them.

    This is to protect staff privacy while any matter is under investigation, and to protect our users from the risk of committing libel. It may also have some bearing on any litigation that might follow from the incident you reported.

    Good luck in getting your issue resolved.

    anorak
    admin
  • 9 Tel Scoomer commented close 22:08 11 Apr 2012

    No constructive suggestions to add. Just wanted to wish you good luck in resolving this.

  • 10 Martin Heron commented close 11:27 12 Apr 2012

    Guys, we are being a bit anti-TfL here. We've not heard their side of the story yet. We don't even know if what the OP has said is true. Before getting angry and uptight, wait for TfL.

  • 11 Martin Heron commented close 11:30 12 Apr 2012

    Also, just for clarity, they are LUL employees, not TfL employees.

  • 12 Martin Heron commented close 11:33 12 Apr 2012

    I believe the FixMyTransport system has incorrectly sent this 'complaint' to TfL as opposed to LUL, as the LUL responses come from the Customer Service centre and not from TfL. I imagine TfL will forward it but expect a longer response time.

  • 13 Myf Nixon commented close 11:38 12 Apr 2012

    Hello Martin,

    FixMyTransport admin here. I have been in touch with Transport for London and they assure me that they are aware of, and dealing with, this case. We route all complaints through the central TfL system at their request - they are then disseminated to the relevant operators when necessary.

    I agree that we should await to hear their side of the story - FixMyTransport is explicitly set up to allow for a balanced record of the correspondence on both sides.

    anorak
    admin
  • 14 Martin Heron commented close 15:22 23 Aug 2012

    Is there any news on this?

  • 15 Myf Nixon commented close 15:41 23 Aug 2012

    Good point Martin - I'm sure many would like to know.

    anorak
    admin
  • 16 Charlotte Law commented close 16:43 01 Nov 2012

    This is terrible. I am so fed up with TfL staff's rudeness. They get away with behaviour that would not be tolerated in any other company and it sickens me. I have given up talking to them as when I do they are invariably point blank rude and unprofessional. I have resorted to complaining on their website but this seems to have no affect either as they have just worse and worse over the last 15 years. What really annoys me is that it is us, the long-suffering passengers who are in effect paying their salaries and they treat us like dirt. The Directors of TfL are clearly not doing their jobs and disciplining their awful staff. I just recommend people complain on their website as they have to log these complaints and it will go on the relevant staff's records, for what it is worth.

  • 17 Tiffany Taylor commented close 19:26 14 Dec 2012

    It would be interesting to find out what happened afterwards. Unfortunately for me 12/12/12 I had a VERY similar incident at a london tube station.
    I have complained to TFL's customer service already and I found this whilst searching for what else I could do or if anyone had been in a similar situation.
    I fully empathise with the way you felt at the station as I too cried out of feeling bullied, hopeless, humiliated and belittled infront of a lot of people.

    Hope you made sure this was followed through all the way to the end.

  • 18 Peter Dixon commented close 19:47 14 Dec 2012

    Hello Tiffany

    I am one of the FixMyTransport volunteers.

    If there is anything that we can do to assist, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

    Kind regards

    anorak
    admin
  • 19 Tiffany Taylor commented close 17:56 16 Dec 2012

    hi Anorak,

    Ideally i would like to find out more information on how I can get legal assistance with issues like this. I've contacted a few people but they usually deal with crime or family issues. And as I want to make sure my complaint is taken fully serious I would like like to get legal help on my options.

  • 20 Myf Nixon commented close 09:47 17 Dec 2012

    Tiffany - if you have had no satisfaction with a London transport complaint, you can contact London Travelwatch, who are an independent passenger watchdog.

    You can find their website here.

    anorak
    admin
  • 21 Artur Sonnenberg commented close 10:18 14 Jan 2013

    Wow, that sounds like violation of few quite serious customer rights plus personal offence... I think I would simply call police while on site, being verbally abused and threatened by someone who claims to be a "staff supervisor".

    Your story made me a little bit concerned, since I found it while I was in the middle of composing a complaint of my own on TfL web, regarding staff. Only I grew curious to find first what actually are the outcomes for a subject of complaint, following Tfl website have gave no answer so maybe someone will brighten me up.

    Talking about my complaint though, it is based on very similar principle as yours, although it never went out of order even nowhere close like that.
    Basically I'm issued with an Oyster/Travelcard by my employers, and yesterday when coming home u

  • 22 Anthony I commented close 13:32 20 Apr 2013

    Did we ever find out what really happened? Did TfL reply to this one?

    It's one thing saying they're taking it seriously and another to send a meaningful reply.

  • 23 Andra Catincescu commented close 10:13 21 Apr 2013

    Hi - I'm Andra, I posted this and sent TFL a complaint. Apologies for not posting an update any earlier.

    After a month of submitting the complaint online and via the telephone, I received an email to notify me that they are looking into my claims, but that unfortunately on this occasion they would be unable to let me know about the outcome of the investigation.

    This was obviously not quite what I had expected considering what a major inconvenience the whole thing had been on the day and how rudely I had been treated (a few days later I went to Waterloo and asked for my cards to be attached, and they did it in 4 seconds without asking me to fill out any form).

    However I also assumed it was unlikely that I would manage to take things any further, so I just left it there. By the sound of it, the staff members in question had to at least read the complaint and answer questions about it, so I hope they will think twice about doing it in future.

    Many thanks everone for the support, and any suggestions on how I could have taken it forward from their response will be appreciated by people with similar circumstances who stumble onto this post, I'm sure.

    Very best,

    Andra

  • 24 MSZ London commented close 12:55 19 Dec 2013

    Unfortunately I am not surprised. TFL have a great campaign against verbal and physical abuse but they forget that their employees should respect us as well. I have had 3 similar cases in the last 4 months (all related to tickets) and every time I was threatened or abused and left uncomfortable for a few hours. I let it go at one stage as complaining does not change anything as they do not seem to do anything about it in my opinion (or not enough). I noticed a lot of members of staff have issues and become very aggressive if you do not agree or want to make a point against (still in a polite way). Last time it happened to me a few days ago where a member of staff was very aggressive, wanted to push me and he tried his best to make me offend him so he could complain...

  • 25 MR Drew commented close 16:20 22 May 2014

    I had my olympic oyster card confiscated after I had expressly stated I would rather lose the money on it than the card ...
    Close the ticket offices... sack the jobsworths....

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